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Conference 2005, The University of Auckland

Organisers

Barbara Grant

Barbara Grant

Barbara Grant has worked at CPD at The University of Auckland for a long time. Her work there has been wide-ranging: from providing teaching preparation for graduate teaching assistants and early-career academic staff, to working with new and experienced supervisors, to assisting academic women in the areas of leadership, academic writing and publishing. Her research into higher education practice falls into the paradigms of critical and post-critical research, usually employing methodologies of discourse analysis.

Helen Sword

Helen Sword

Helen Sword was appointed to the academic staff at the University of Auckland’s Centre for Professional Development (CPD) in August 2004. Trained as a literary scholar, she holds a PhD in Comparative Literature from Princeton University and has published widely on modernist poetry and related topics. Before immigrating to New Zealand in 2001, she was an Associate Professor of English at Indiana University and a member of Indiana’s state-wide Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching.

At CPD, Helen works with academic staff from across the disciplines to help develop innovative pedagogies and to foster a more fruitful and dynamic integration of the University’s teaching and research cultures. Her current research interests include multiple intelligences, peer assessment strategies and the role of creativity in higher education.

Tony Harland

Tony Harland

Tony graduated from the University of Newcastle (UK) in Zoology in 1987 and then did a Masters degree in marine biology at Newcastle and Plymouth Marine Laboratories. His PhD at the University of Glasgow was in the physiology and ecology of marine invertebrates, in particular the symbiotic sea anemones and tropical corals. After his PhD, he taught at Glasgow before going to the University of Strathclyde where he spent a year training to be a secondary school science teacher.

In 1994 he returned to teach biology at Glasgow's Zoology Department. At this point he began to shift the emphasis of his research to Higher Education and started to work half-time in the Undergraduate Teaching Unit. In 1996 this interest took him to the University of Sheffield where he directed the Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education, a professional course for university teachers. His current position is Senior Lecturer in the Higher Education Development Centre at Otago, where he works in university teaching and learning. He maintains an undergraduate teaching role and has experience in enquiry and problem-based learning in ecology teaching. Tony's research interests include the professional development of university teachers and student learning.

Kathryn Sutherland

Kathryn Sutherland

Kathryn has a BA(Hons) in English and New Zealand Studies from Waikato University, and a Masters in English from the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. In the early nineties, she had brief stints working in Canada and Malaysia, as well as teaching English, Art, History and Drama at an Auckland secondary school.

While in Canada, completing her Masters, she changed her focus from post-colonial literature to pedagogy, and came back to New Zealand to undertake a PhD in English and Education at Massey University. Her PhD thesis, completed in 1999, called for a reconceptualisation of teaching, scholarship, and the PhD programme in New Zealand university English departments.

This research focus, and her experience in teaching English literature and written communication to undergraduate students at various universities, led to her current employment as a lecturer in the University Teaching Development Centre (UTDC) at Victoria University of Wellington. She works primarily with new academics and her main research interests lie in the professional development of new university teaching staff, the reconceptualisation of the PhD programme in NZ universities, and looking into new ways for framing the work that academic developers do.

Contacts

Organisers

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© 2005 Educational Media, HEDC, University of Otago, New Zealand